FAQs

Frequently asked questions about the National Quality Framework. 

Supervisor certificates

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1. What is a certified supervisor?

A certified supervisor is a person who can be in day-to-day charge of a service when the Provider and the Nominated Supervisor are not present.  The Nominated Supervisor must be a certified supervisor.

2. How many certified supervisors is a service allowed to have?

A service can have as many certified supervisors as the provider wants, but only one of these can be the service's nominated supervisor.

3. If I am a certified supervisor placed in day to day charge of a service, am I liable for the same things as the nominated supervisor?

No. If  you are a certified supervisor placed in day to day charge of a service, but not the service's nominated supervisor, you do not assume the liabilities of the nominated supervisor under the National Law and Regulations.

4. Are all certified supervisors in NSW required to have completed a course in child protection?

No. The National Regulations only require nominated supervisors, and certified supervisors placed in day to day charge of a service in NSW, to have completed an approved course in child protection.

5. What courses in child protection are approved?

6. How do I get a supervisor certificate?

From 1 June 2014 the Department of Education has issued a service supervisor certificate for each approved education and care service. This certificate covers any person working at the service who has been identified by the approved provider within the service as:

  • responsible for the day to day management of the service or
  • exercising supervisory and leadership responsibilities of the service or
  • a family day care coordinator

7. What criteria does the designated person need to meet to be covered by the service supervisor certificate?

The approved provider needs to consider the person's:

  • history of involvement with education and care services

  • compliance with the law

  • Working with Children Check status

The person must have:

  • adequate knowledge and understanding of the provision of education and care to children

  • the ability to effectively supervise and manage an education and care service

AND

  • have at least one of the following:

    • at least three year's experience working as an educator in an education and care service or children's service or school, or

    • an approved diploma-level education and care qualification, or

    • an approved early childhood teacher qualification.

A Supervisor Certificate may be issued to an applicant who does not meet the requirement for qualifications or length of experience.  However, that person can only be the nominated supervisor of, or placed in day to day charge of, a service that primarily educations and cares for children who are over preschool age.

8. Does a certified supervisor need to have completed an approved course in child protection in order to get a supervisor certificate?

No. The certified supervisor only needs to have completed an approved course in child protection if s/he is a nominated supervisor of a service or to be placed in day to day charge of a service.


Nominated supervisor

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9. What is a nominated supervisor?

A nominated supervisor is a person with a supervisor certificate who has been nominated by the provider to hold certain responsibilities spanning the service's operations. Information about these responsibilities is available from the ACECQA website.

The definition of nominated supervisor is in the National Law (section 5 – definitions).

10. How does a person become the nominated supervisor of a service?

[For authorised supervisors of existing long day care, family day care and preschool services in NSW…]

If you were the authorised supervisor of an approved service under the NSW Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act 1998 on 31 December 2011, you are taken to be the nominated supervisor of the service from 1 January 2012. You don't need to be nominated by the service's provider.

[For supervisors of services approved after 1 January 2012, including existing outside school hours care services…]

In the application for service approval, the approved provider must nominate a person with a supervisor certificate (or a person who has lodged an application for a supervisor certificate) to be the nominated supervisor of the service.

The application must include that person's written consent to the nomination.

11. Are all services required to have a nominated supervisor under the National Quality Framework?

Yes. The approved provider of an education and care service commits an offence if the service does not have a nominated supervisor.

12. Does the nominated supervisor have to be present at the service at all times?

No. The National Law requires service providers to ensure that at all times the service is educating and caring for children, one of the following persons is present (for a centre-based service) or available to provide support (for a family day care service):

  • the approved provider

  • the nominated supervisor

  • a certified supervisor placed in day to day charge.

Being 'available to provide support' for a family day care service includes being available by telephone.

13. Can I be the nominated supervisor for more than one service?

Yes, you can be the nominated supervisor for more than one service. However, the Department of Education encourages people who are thinking of being the nominated supervisor of several services to consider the obligations the nominated supervisor has under the National Law and Regulations. These obligations apply even if the nominated supervisor is not physically present at the service and need to be taken seriously.

14. As the service provider, what do I have to do if the nominated supervisor for my service changes?

You must notify the Department of Education through the NQA ITS in writing seven days before the new nominated supervisor starts work, or if that's not possible, within 14 days of them starting.

NOTE: You do not need to notify the Department when a person with a supervisor certificate is placed in day to day charge of the service in the absence of the provider or the nominated supervisor of the service.


Supervision of services

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15. Who needs to be present or available at the service (the 'responsible person')?

A centre-based education and care service must have at least one of the following people present at the service at all times the service is educating and caring for children:

  • the approved provider, or
  • the nominated supervisor, or
  • a certified supervisor placed in day to day charge.

This person is sometimes referred to as the 'responsible person' for the service.

For a family day care service, one of these three people (the approved provider, the nominated supervisor or a certified supervisor placed in day to day charge) must be available to provide support to the family day care educators at all times the service is educating and caring for children. 'Available' includes being available by telephone.

16. Can an approved provider appoint a person to be the nominated supervisor or person in day to day charge at a service?

Yes. In July 2014, all services in NSW operating under the National Quality Framework, received a prescribed class certified supervisor certificate. This allows an approved provider to  appoint a person to be in day to day charge  at the service or to be the nominated supervisor at the service. The approved provider must identify that the person meets the new definition  for a service supervisor certificate (see Regulation 238A) and the person must give written consent to be placed in day to day charge (Regulation 54) or to be the nominated supervisor at the service.


Assessment and rating

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17. I need to prepare a Quality Improvement Plan for my service. Where can I get help with this?

Visit the Assessment and Rating page for more information include the NSW Quality Improvement Plan template.


Approved learning frameworks

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18. Is it compulsory to use an 'approved learning framework' in my service?

The National Law says that the provider and nominated supervisor of a service must ensure the service delivers a program that is based on an 'approved learning framework'.  They also have to ensure that the program is delivered in accordance with the framework.

Services of school-age children need only prepare programs that relate to the service as a whole.  There is no need to prepare individual programs for each child.


Ratios and qualifications

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19. What are the educator to child ratios for New South Wales under the National Regulations?

Centre based services

Age of children

Educator to child ratio

Birth to 24 months

1:4

Over 24 months and less than 36 months

1:5

Over 36 months - preschool age

1:10

Over preschool age

Not yet a national requirement, and no requirements currently apply in NSW

Family day care services 

  • 1:7 for each family day care educator

  • no more than four children preschool age or under, including the educator's own children under 13.

20. What qualifications must educators in services have in New South Wales?

Type of service

Qualification

Centre based service (caring for children who are preschool age and under)

At least 50% of the educators required to meet ratio requirements must have or be working towards at least an approved Diploma level education and care qualification.

All other educators who are required to meet ratio requirements must have or be working towards at least an approved Certificate III level education and care qualification.

Family day care service

Educators must have or be working towards at least an approved Certificate III level education and care qualification.

Family day care coordinators must have at least an approved Diploma level education and care qualification.

21. What are the staff to child ratios when taking children on an excursion?

The Education and Care Services National Regulations do not require any special educator to child ratio for excursions. The usual educator to child ratio applies.

However regulation 100 requires a risk assessment to be carried out before the service approaches parents or carers for permission to take the children on the excursion.

22. Who assesses the qualifications of staff wishing to work in education and care services?

The organisation which assesses qualifications to determine whether they meet the requirements for positions in services covered by the National Quality Framework is the Australian Children's Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA).

There is a list of qualifications which have been assessed and approved by ACECQA on its website.

If you intend to work in an NQF service and your qualification is not on the ACECQA list you can apply to ACECQA to have your qualification assessed. Information about how to apply, including the application form and guides are on their website. You can also contact ACECQA on enquiries@acecqa.gov.au

If you intend to work in a service not covered by the NQF (occasional care and mobile services) you need to apply to the Early Childhood Education and Care Directorate of the NSW Department of Education and Communities.  See Qualifications for details about how to apply, including the application form and extra information for those with overseas qualifications.


Early childhood teacher requirements

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23. What qualifications are you required to have under the National Quality Framework to be an early childhood teacher?

You must have an approved early childhood teaching qualification to be considered an early childhood teacher under the National Quality Framework.

The Australian Children's Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) is responsible for approving early childhood teacher qualifications. A list of approved qualifications is available on the ACECQA website.

If you were recognised as a teaching staff member under the former NSW Children's Services Regulation 2004, you are recognised as an early childhood teacher under the National Law, even if your qualification does not appear on the list of approved early childhood teaching qualifications published by ACECQA.

24. Will my qualification be recognised as an early childhood teacher qualification under the National Quality Framework?

The Australian Children's Education and Care Quality Authority (ACECQA) is responsible for approving early childhood teacher qualifications. A list of approved qualifications is available on the ACECQA website.

If you were recognised as a teaching staff member under the former NSW Children's Services Regulation 2004, you are recognised as an early childhood teacher under the National Law, even if your qualification does not appear on the list of approved early childhood teaching qualifications published by ACECQA.

25. Do early childhood teachers need to be four-year trained under the National Quality Framework?

The National Law and Regulations do not specify whether an early childhood teacher needs to be three-year or four-year trained.

26. Does regulation 242 – Persons taken to be early childhood teachers apply in NSW?

In NSW, regulation 242 only applies at a centre-based service with fewer than 30 children in attendance. It applies on or after 1 January 2014 and before 1 January 2018.

Regulation 242 is a general transitional provision which permits the approved provider of a centre-based education and care service to count a person who is actively working towards an early childhood teacher qualification as an early childhood teacher if the person gives the provider evidence that the person:

  • has completed fifty per cent of the course; or
  • already holds an approved diploma-level education and care qualification.

27. How many early childhood teachers (or what early childhood teacher-to-child ratio) is my service required to have?

 

National/NQF

Approved Placed Requirement Requirement by January 2020
Less than 25 children Access to an ECT for at least 20 per cent of the time Same
25 - 59 children ECT in attendance for:
- 6 hours/ day (if operating for or more 50 hours/ week)
- 60% of operating hours (if operating less than 50 hours /week)
Same
60 - 80 children As above Second ECT in attendance for:
- 3 hours/ day (if operating for or more 50 hours/ week)
- 30% of operating hours (if operating less than 50 hours / week) (or half FTE equivalent)
Over 80 children As above Second ECT in attendance for:
- 6 hours/ day (if operating for or more 50 hours/ week)
- 60% of operating hours (if operating less than 50 hours /week)
(or full FTE equivalent)

There are slight differences for centre-based services regualted under NSW Law (ie mobile services, occasional care).  Requirements are as follows:

Approved places Requirement
Less than 25 children NQF rules apply
25 - 29 children  NQF rules apply
30 - 39 children One ECT in attendance at all times
40 - 59 children Two ECTs in attendance at all times
60 - 79 children Three ECTs in attendance at all times
80 or more children Four ECTs in attendance at all times

Remote and very remote services (until January 2018):

Licenced capacity NQF NSW
More than 25 children Access to an ECT for at least 20% of the time (including IT) Applies only to Centres with under 30 children.  Over 30, NSW requirements for ECTs (see above) apply.

28. Does an early childhood teacher have to be working directly with the children at the service?

An Early Childhood Teacher (ECT) does not need to be working directly with the children at the service for the service to meet its requirements to have access to an ECT or to have ECTs in attendance, but the ECT does need to be working directly with children to be counted for the purposes of educator-to-child ratios.

Services with fewer than 25 children preschool age or under have been required to have access to ECTs from 1 January 2014. Access may be provided via information and communication technology (ICT), for example by phone or skype.

Services with 25-29 children preschool age or under have been required to have one or more ECTs in attendance from 1 January 2014. Services with 30 or more children will continue to be required, to have one or more ECTs in attendance.

"In attendance" means the teacher is physically present at the service and carries out activities including one or more of the following:

  • working directly with children

  • planning programs

  • mentoring, coaching or supporting educators

  • facilitating research

  • performing the role of an educational leader.

ECTs will need to be working directly with the children if the service wishes to count the ECT for the purposes of educator-to-child ratios. "Working directly with children" means being physically present with them and being directly engaged in providing education and care to them. For centre-based services the educator-to-child ratios are as follows. For children aged:

  • birth to 24 months – 1:4

  • 25 months to 35 months –  1:5 

  • 36 months to 6 years – 1:10.

29. Does an early childhood teacher have to be on the premises at all times?

Where the National Regulations prescribe that an early childhood teacher must be in attendance at an education and care service (for services educating and caring for 25 or more children who are preschool age or under), the early childhood teacher must be physically present at the service.

Where the National Regulations prescribe that a service must have access to an early childhood teacher (for services educating and caring for fewer than 25 children who are preschool age or under), the requirement can be satisfied by an early childhood teacher working with the service by means of information communication technology.

30. Does regulation 135 – Early childhood teacher illness or absence apply in NSW?

Yes - Regulation 135 allows a person who holds an approved diploma qualification or primary teaching qualification to be taken to be an early childhood teacher when an early childhood teacher is absent from a service due to short term illness or leave (not exceeding 12 weeks).

31. Why are the early childhood teacher requirements for NSW services caring for 30 or more children different from the national requirements?

NSW has led other jurisdictions in requiring most early childhood services to have university trained early childhood teachers.Given the importance of staff qualification levels, when NSW entered into the National Quality Agenda Agreement in 2009 with all other Australian governments it ensured that the existing NSW requirements for early childhood teachers in all centre-based services educating and caring for children who are preschool age or under would be retained.

This means NSW is retaining its existing requirements for there to be:

  • at least one early childhood teacher when there are 30-39 children in attendance;
  • at least two early childhood teachers when there are 40-59 children in attendance;
  • at least three early childhood teachers when there are 60-79 children in attendance; and
  • at least four early childhood teachers when there are 80 or more children in attendance. 

32. What does it mean for an early childhood teacher to be 'in attendance' at all times that a service is caring for a particular number of children?

The definition of 'in attendance' is in regulation 11 of the Education and Care Services National Regulations.

An early childhood teacher is in attendance at a centre-based service if the teacher is physically present at the service and carries out education and care activities at the service including one or more of the following –

  1. working directly with children;

  2. planning programs;

  3. mentoring, coaching or supporting educators;

  4. facilitating education and care research;

  5. performing the role of educational leader of the service referred to in regulation 118. 

It is important to note thatan educator cannot be included in calculating the educator to child ratio of a centre based service unless the educator is working directly with children at the service (regulation 122).

33. What are the requirements if an early childhood teacher is absent due to being unwell or on leave?

Regulation 135 allows a person who holds an approved diploma qualification or primary teaching qualification to be taken to be an early childhood teacher, when an early childhood teacher is absent from a service due to short term illness or leave (not exceeding 12 weeks).


Family day care

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34. What is a family day care coordinator, educator, and educator assistant? What is the role of a certified supervisor in family day care?

Family day care providers must ensure that at all times one or more qualified persons are employed as family day care coordinators of the service. A coordinator's role is to assist with the operation of the service, and to support, monitor and train its educators.  Coordinators need to hold an approved diploma level qualification.

Family day care educators are engaged by or registered with a family day care service to provide education and care for children at a residence or at an approved family day care venue. They must have, or be actively working towards, an approved certificate III level qualification.

Family day care educator assistants are persons who can assist the educator in the circumstances specified in regulation 144.

See elsewhere in the FAQs for an explanation of the role of certified supervisors generally. A certified supervisor placed in day to day charge of the family day care service is one of the sources of support that the provider can use in fulfilling their requirement to provide support at all times for their educators. Other sources of support include the provider themselves, or the nominated supervisor for the service.


Other operational requirements

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35. Where can I find help with the policy and procedure requirements of regulation 168?

Service providers must ensure that their services have policies and procedures on all the matters listed in regulation 168 (and additional matters listed in regulation 169 for family day care services). It is not necessary to have an individual policy for each of the matters, so long as all are covered.

The Guide to the National Law and National Regulations  has a table with references for the content of the policies required. You may also be able to get help with developing policies from the industry bodies and organisations listed on our links and resources page and on ACECQA's links page.

36. What are the outdoor space requirements for OSHC services?

The provider of a centre-based OSHC service must ensure that, for each child being educated and cared for, the service premises have at least 7 square metres of unencumbered outdoor space. This is set out in regulation 108.

Unencumbered outdoor space cannot include: pathways or thoroughfares (except where used as part of an education program); car parks; storage sheds; verandahs that are already included in indoor space calculations under regulation 107; or any other space that is not suitable for children.

For services that cater for children over preschool age (as defined by regulation 4), outdoor space calculations can include unencumbered indoor space, but only with the written approval of the regulatory authority and where the area was not included as part of the indoor space calculation.

The space requirements of regulation 108 do not apply to a family day care residence.


Fitness and propriety

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37. What does "fit and proper" mean?

Being fit and proper is a requirement for applicants for provider approvals and for supervisor certificates.

Matters that are taken into account in determining whether a person is fit and proper include:

  • the person's history of compliance with the National Law
  • any previous decisions to refuse, refuse to renew, suspend or cancel approvals or certifications of the person
  • the person's working with children check (and a criminal history record check in the case of applicants for provider approvals)
  • whether the person has any medical condition affecting their capacity to be responsible for providing the service, or their suitability to be a supervisor.

An additional matter relevant for provider approval applicants is whether the person is bankrupt, or their financial circumstances significantly limit their capacity to meet their obligations under the National Law.

38. When the application forms refer to a 'person with management or control of' a service what do they mean?

This is defined by section 5 of the Education and Care Services National Law.  The definition of a:

person with management or control in relation to an education and care service, means -

(a) if the provider or intended provider of the service is a body corporate, an officer of the body corporate within the meaning of the Corporations Act 2001 of the Commonwealth who is responsible for managing the delivery of the education and care service; or

(b) if the provider of the service is an eligible association, each member of the executive committee of the association who has the responsibility, alone or with others, for managing the delivery of the education and care service; or

(c) if the provider of the service is a partnership, each partner who has the responsibility, alone or with others, for managing the delivery of the education and care service; or

(d) in any other case, a person who has the responsibility, alone or with others, for managing the delivery of the education and care service

If you are having difficulty working out who in your organisation is in management or control of your service (and there may be a few people in that position, not just one) we recommend that you get independent advice.  The Department is unable to advise you on this matter which depends very much on how your organisation operates.

39. Do the ID documents I provide have to be originals?

No. You can provide certified copies of ID documents. In fact, we strongly discourage you from providing originals of important ID such as passports, driver licences, Medicare cards, birth certificates and citizenship certificates.


Definitions

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40. Is the type of business or service I want to operate an education and care service which requires an approval?

There are two main pieces of legislation under which children's education and care services in NSW are regulated:

  • The Education and Care Services National Law 

  • The Children (Education and Care Services) Supplementary Provisions Act 2011.

However not all types of services are captured by this legislation.

National Quality Framework

To decide whether the type of service you intend to operate is captured by the National Quality Framework you will need to look at:

Also have a look at the Guide to the Education and Care Services National Law and Regulations, especially pages 11 and 12.

Supplementary Provisions Act

This act applies only to service not covered by the National Quality Framework such as Mobile, Home Based and Occasional Care Services.

To decide whether the type of service you intend to operate is captured by the Children (Education and Care Services) Supplementary Provisions Act 2011 you will need to look at the definition of 'State regulated education and care service' in section 4 of the Act.

41. Are outside school hours care services that provide education and care to children with disabilities excluded from the National Quality framework?

Outside school hours care services are generally included among the education and care services regulated by the National Quality Framework (NQF). Section 5 of the National Law defines an education and care service as "any service providing or intended to provide education and care on a regular basis to children under 13 years of age".

However, an outside school hours care service may be excluded from NQF coverage if it is:

  • a disability service provided or funded by the Minister for Disability Services (this can be confirmed through Ageing, Disability and Home Care in the Department of Family and Community Services), or
  • an early childhood intervention service provided for the principal purpose of providing intervention or support for children with a disability, additional needs or developmental delay. If this kind of service is provided, even to children above school age, the NQF will not apply.

42. What is the definition of 'child preschool age or under'?

The National Regulations define 'child preschool age or under' as a child who is under the age of 7 years and is not enrolled or registered at school nor attending or due to attend school in the current calendar year.

43. Can children preschool age or under be educated and cared for in an OSHC service?

The National Law and Regulations do not specifically refer to outside school hours care (OSHC) services. 

Some requirements, such as educator to child ratios and staff qualification requirements, only apply if there are children preschool age or under at the service, while some other requirements (eg fencing requirements) do not apply to centre-based services that primarily educate and care for children over preschool age.

However, the majority of requirements in the National Law and Regulations apply to all centre-based education and care services, regardless of the age of the children attending the service.

44. Can children over preschool age be educated and cared for in a centre-based education and care service? If so, what are the educator to child ratios?

Yes.

The National Regulations specify educator to child ratios for children preschool age or under. In New South Wales, there is no prescribed educator to child ratio for children over preschool age.

Where there are children of mixed ages, the ratio requirements must be maintained for each age range of children preschool age or under.

45. What is the meaning of 'children who do not ordinarily attend school'?

The Regulations define a 'child over preschool age' as being a child who is enrolled or registered at a school and attends, or in the current calendar year will attend, school. These children can be regarded as ordinarily attending school for the purposes of determining the appropriate educator to child ratios for family day care.

The educator to child ratio for family day care remains at 1:7, but no more than 4 children can be preschool age or under.


Service approvals

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46. What do plans of premises need to show in terms of indoor and outdoor space?

The plans of premises lodged with service approval applications need to show the unencumbered indoor and outdoor spaces suitable for children at the service. They must also show the calculations of the area of unencumbered indoor space (except for an OSHC that already existed before 2012) and unencumbered outdoor space. See Regulation 25 for details of what the plans must show.

Sometimes plans of premises that are lodged with service approval applications include parts of the premises that are not going to be used by the service (for example plans of school premises that include one or two buildings in which an OSHC operates). In these cases it is important to indicate clearly on the plan the area or areas to be used by the service.


The following questions only apply to services regulated under the Children (Education and Care Services) Supplementary Provisions Regulation 2012

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47. Clause 66(1) of the Regulation refers to 'not performing other duties while supervising children'. What does this mean?

Clause 65 requires providers and nominated supervisors to ensure that primary contact staff do not perform other duties while supervising children. In the case of a home-based service the Regulation imposes an obligation directly on the provider to not perform other duties while supervising children.

Maintaining supervision is a key to ensuring the health and safety of children at a service. It is important that any person responsible for supervising the children is not distracted from that role by having to do other tasks.

Any task that distracts a person and diminishes their ability to focus on their primary duty of supervising children could be classed as 'other duties'. Examples include cleaning, cooking or doing paperwork at the same time as supervising children.

In the case of home based care, the provider may need to perform some tasks which are essential for the operation of the service while supervising children. For example, the provider may need to organise lunch for the children. However, they must ensure that these tasks are carried out in a way, and at a time, that will still allow them to maintain an appropriate level of supervision. In working out what an appropriate level of supervision is things to consider include the ages and physical and intellectual development of the children and the activities in which they are engaged.

48. What do I need to consider in developing emergency and evacuation procedures?

Clause 83 of the Regulation requires that providers ensure that a written emergency plan for fire and other emergencies, including evacuation procedures, is developed, maintained and implemented.

The purpose of the plan is to have a procedure ready in case there is an emergency, such as a fire or bomb threat, and people who are at the service need to leave the building quickly.

The plan must take account of the individual circumstances of the service, including the needs and ages of particular children, such as children with medical needs and infants, and their supplies. It should also take into account the location of the service and the nature of its premises. For example, a service located in a multi storey building would need an exit strategy that covers not just exiting the service premises but also the building.

It is also important for the plan to say who is responsible for essential tasks that would need to be done, for example:

  • alerting everyone on site about the situation and contacting emergency services

  • caring for the children and taking them to a pre-determined safe assembly area or areas

  • checking the service to ensure no one is left behind

  • collecting essential items, such as children's medication

  • deciding what exit point or points to evacuate from

  • checking that everyone is safe in the assembly area(s)

  • deciding when it is safe to go back into the service.

In developing the plan providers should consider what equipment may be useful to transport smaller children off the premises, such as baby pouches and evacuation cots.

Clause 83(3) of the Regulation requires emergency and evacuation procedures to be practised at least once every three months. Records of each practice run must be kept for a period of two years after the practice run. Regular practice helps to ensure that everyone at the service is familiar with the procedures. It also highlights any potential problems with the plan and will help providers to keep the plan up to date.

49. Who is a 'visitor' for the purposes of keeping records of visitors under clause 93 of the Regulation?

Clause 93 requires records to be kept about staff and visitors at a education and care service.

In this context, a 'visitor' is anyone who enters the service premises except for:

  • children attending the service
  • the children's parents (or other people with responsibility for them) when they come to drop off or collect the children
  • staff in centre based and mobile services

Parents who visit the service during operating hours other than to drop off or collect children would be regarded as visitors.

50. What are the anaphylaxis and emergency asthma management training requirements for state regulated education and care services, and when do these requirements become mandatory?

State regulated education and care services must have in attendance at least one educator who has undergone approved anaphylaxis management training and at least one educator who has undergone approved emergency asthma management training. In the case of home-based services it is the home-based provider who is required to undertake the approved training.

Service providers must also ensure that an adult who has completed approved anaphylaxis management training and an adult who has completed approved emergency asthma management training accompany children on any excursions conducted by the service. Approved training is listed on the ACECQA website.

Translate

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Key regulations

Here is a summary of key Regulations for easy reference.

Comparison table

This table compares key provisions of the Children's Services Regulation 2004 with the Education and Care Services National Regulations.

Need more help?

If you require more assistance with the implementation of the National Quality Framework, you can also contact peak bodies representing your sector. See under ‘industry bodies' on our links and resources page.