App engages young children in learning activities

An app that uses the human face as the focus for learning has been launched by the department to support young children in early literacy and numeracy.

The I have fun with faces app for iPad and Android tablets engages young children in many learning activities by focusing on facial features. They join in singing, listening, reading and solving jigsaws about parts of the face.

Learning design officer, Jo Woodrow from the department's learning systems directorate, said the app helped children in preschool and Kindergarten to explore and learn about a topic that was instantly meaningful.

Exploring the foundations of numeracy and literacy

She said the app is visually appealing and includes audio support.  It encourages children to explore the foundations of ITC, numeracy and literacy through word association, reading, talking and imagery.

"The first thing babies look at is their parents' faces. As they grow they learn to say parts of the face ... it's something children are familiar with from a very early age.

"In Kindergarten topics are often studied such as ‘who am I?' which includes their identity - how many in the class or how many have brown hair. They count them and make graphs so the app supports a whole range of early learning subjects."

The app features four sections:

  •  song and actions:  children listen to and perform actions to a song or learn and sing along with the music
  • create a face:  children read and place the labels of parts of the face into the correct boxes, drag the features to the correct part of the face and find the hidden facial features
  •  read a story: listen to and read a long and short version of a story called Faces
  •  jigsaws: complete 9, 12 or 16 piece  jigsaws with four of each to solve.

Ms Woodrow said the app was so popular it had already appeared in the App Store's What's hot list for education.

The app can be downloaded free from the App Store for iPads or from Google play for Android devices.

 

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