Stronger digital skills for future teachers

27 March 2017

A review of NSW university teaching degrees has identified the need to better prepare teachers for an increasingly digital and online world.

Education Minister Rob Stokes today welcomed the release of the Digital Literacy Skills and Learning Report, prepared by the NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA), and gave the go-ahead for implementing recommendations for improving teacher training.

Mr Stokes said graduate teachers today should be entering classrooms with a level of digital literacy far beyond simple use of email, Google and Facebook. 

"Parents need to be assured that teachers entering the classroom for the first time are up to the challenge of equipping 21st century students with the technological skills to succeed in an increasingly digital world," Mr Stokes said.

"We know skills like coding are increasingly sought after across professions and industries."

Mr Stokes said teachers needed to have the skills to assist students move from being consumers of digital products to producers of digital solutions. Teachers also need knowledge of ethical and responsible use of digital technologies.

He has instructed the NESA to immediately start work on implementing the report's seven recommendations, which include incorporating new requirements for digital literacy skills into Initial Teacher Education accreditation processes.

President of the NSW Council of Deans of Education Professor Michele Simons said the Deans are pleased to support the report and its recommendations. 
"We look forward to working with NESA and continuing our systematic efforts to improve teaching quality," Professor Simons said.

The Digital Literacy Skills and Learning Report is the fifth report a series initiated as part of the Government's Great Teaching, Inspired Learning reforms. 
The report can be downloaded from educationstandards.nsw.edu.au

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