TAFE NSW honoured at training awards

Education minister, Adrian Piccoli, Brendan Hillsley, 2011 NSW Apprentice of the Year and deputy director-general, TAFE NSW, Pam Christie.

TAFE NSW featured prominently at the 2011 NSW Training Awards, presented at a ceremony in Sydney recently.

The awards, which celebrate the vocational education and training sector, recognise the achievements of apprentices and trainees, students, training organisations, schools and employers across 16 categories, and highlight the integral role of training in every region and sector of the economy.

Education minister Adrian Piccoli, who presented the awards, said vocational education and training was the backbone of the state's economy and without its contribution NSW would not be as prosperous.

"A record number of applications were received this year, so to be presented with an award is an amazing achievement, and one of which these winners should be extremely proud," Mr Piccoli said.

Brendon Hillsley, trained in meat processing by TAFE NSW South Western Sydney Institute, was awarded Apprentice of the Year.

The Vocational Student of the Year award went to commercial cookery student Galit Segev fromTAFE NSW Sydney Institute.

TAFE NSW New England Institute won the award for Large Training Provider of the Year.

A new award category this year – the VET Trainer/Teacher of the Year – was won by Robert Lawson from Boorowa Central School.

"This award pays tribute to the dedication and leadership that trainers and teachers deliver to our students," Mr Piccoli said.

More than 1060 students, schools, registered training organisations and employers were nominated for the awards.

Read full details of award categories and the winners of the 2011 NSW Training Awards.

Photo: Education minister, Adrian Piccoli, Brendan Hillsley, 2011 NSW Apprentice of the Year and deputy director-general, TAFE NSW, Pam Christie.

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